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Articles Tagged Microphone World

  • Friday, May 22, 2015
    microphones
    James Cadwallader 05/22/15 08:02 AM,
    Everyone agrees with the idea that you point the microphone at what you want it to pick up. But there’s another side to the coin: pointing the mic away from what you don’t want. This perspective applies both for using a particular polar pattern to eliminate undesired pickup or miking unconventionally to find a desired sound. Take drum miking. Snare bleed in the hi-hat mic can blur the snare in the mix, especially for those drummers who know how to… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneSignalSound ReinforcementTechnician

  • Thursday, May 07, 2015
    wireless systems
    Craig Leerman 05/07/15 09:22 AM,
    Wireless systems are a key component in almost every facet of live entertainment production, especially concerts and corporate meetings and events. The demand continues to increase as the supply of available bandwidth is both shrinking and becoming more congested. As a result, pre-planning and wireless frequency coordination are becoming more important, particularly as the FCC (Federal Communications Commission) is preparing to sell off more of the UHF spectrum where the majority of wireless microphones and monitoring systems operate (currently 470-698… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallMeasurementMicrophoneSignalSoftwareSound ReinforcementWireless

  • Monday, April 20, 2015
    image
    Craig Leerman 04/20/15 03:10 PM,
    Microphones come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes, but many of us typically categorize them in two basic groups: vocals and instruments. And the truth is that many models can excel at either task. Take the ubiquitous Shure SM57. It’s a “go-to” instrument mic found in almost every live and studio mic kit yet it also handles vocals and speech quite well. Ever see the podium for the president of the United States? It’s long incorporated a pair… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureSlideshowMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStage

  • Friday, April 10, 2015
    recording
    Bruce A. Miller 04/10/15 02:12 PM,
    This article is provided by BAMaudioschool.com.   Once upon a time I was doing the typical thing of going with what I was told worked or what I watched the engineers I had assisted do.  Specifically, I was recording piano with a pair of matching microphones in an XY pattern around the hammers. I knew about many approaches (another mic at the far end of the piano and then pan that mic over to the bass side of the stereo… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneMixerProcessorSignalStudio

  • Monday, March 30, 2015
    microphones
    Bruce Bartlett 03/30/15 07:58 AM,
    Perhaps the most exciting type of recording comes in the live realm, whether it be in a club or concert hall or stadium. Many musicians and bands want to record live because they feel that’s when they play best. The goal, then, is to capture the performance so it can be brought back alive. Remote recording is exhilarating. The musicians - excited by the audience - often put on a stellar performance. Usually you only get one chance to get… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStage

  • Friday, March 27, 2015
    old soundman
    Old Soundman 03/27/15 02:49 PM,
    Somebody has been feeding misinformation to our pal Roy here. He wrote in twice and I have taken the liberty of mixing and matching excerpts from both his missives. Good Sir - Yes, Roy! I was hoping you would grace us with your suggestions on miking guitar amps, placement and such. When you go to concerts, do you ever see the taped “X” on some poser’s 4 x 12 cabinet? Either he or his guitar tech has painstakingly determined that… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBusinessEngineerMicrophoneSound Reinforcement

  • Thursday, March 05, 2015
    audio-technica
    Mark Frink 03/05/15 03:34 PM,
    The drum sound is the heart of any band mix: kick drum keeps the pulse going, while the snare drives the rhythm and the overall beat gives each song its groove. Dynamic microphones are used for close miking drums because they’re sturdy, handle high SPL, provide off-axis rejection and often have a presence boost around 4 kHz that emphasizes attack. At the same time, digital consoles have changed the live sound workflow. Their instant recall forces drum sound check to… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesEngineerMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStageWireless

  • Thursday, February 26, 2015
    microphones
    Greg Stone 02/26/15 04:11 PM,
    All microphones are not created equal. Cardioid, supercardioid, hypercardioid, condenser, ribbon - literally dozens of choices. (It’s enough to give you a cardioid cardiac!) In many situations, our budgets just won’t allow the top-of-the-line models in our mic cases. Meanwhile, the same questions present themselves for every show, large or small. What kind of mic(s) on the backline? What to do about the softly singing angel at lead vocal? What about the singer that can never ever stay on mic… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureVideoStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneMonitoringStage

  • Tuesday, February 17, 2015
    wireless
    Ike Zimbel 02/17/15 04:32 PM,
    One of the main causes of RF (radio frequency) interference is intermodulation products created by our own wireless equipment. In this piece, I will outline some of the common setup and handling errors that contribute to this problem. First up is increased noise floor and intermodulation (intermod or IM) products due to transmitters being in very close proximity. If you work with a single band and just put mics up on stands every day, you might not encounter this. But… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallMeasurementMicrophoneRemoteSignalSound ReinforcementStageWireless

  • Friday, February 06, 2015
    live sound international
    Chris Huff 02/06/15 10:44 AM,
    I created a frog. It wasn’t intentional. Naturally, I’m not talking about a real frog, but look at the photo that opens this article. You’ll never read a mixing book that says, “Make the snare’s EQ curve look like a frog in water.” (If you do, stop immediately and back away.) Seriously, when it comes to snare mixing, the last place (literally) you want to be is behind the mixer. With that in mind, here are three primary factors I’ve… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureStudy HallConsolesEngineerMicrophoneMixerProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement