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Articles Tagged Loudspeaker World

  • Monday, July 25, 2016
    loudspeakers
    Hadi Sumoro & Xian Yu 07/25/16 04:31 PM,
    This article is provided by HX Audio Lab   Several common questions are often asked related to loudspeaker sound reproduction, such as: 1. Why does a loudspeaker sound different when moved to another room? 2. Why does my new bookshelf loudspeaker sound terrible at home? They were great in the showroom! 3. Why does the loudspeaker sound muddy/bassy inside a room? It was great when I listened to it outside. There are other questions, but readers can get the point… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallAVEducationEngineerInstallationLoudspeakerMeasurementSoftwareSound ReinforcementSubwoofer

  • Tuesday, July 19, 2016
    crossovers
    Dennis A. Bohn 07/19/16 11:16 AM,
    This article is provided by Rane Corporation.   In space, no one can hear you scream ... because there is no air or other medium for sound to travel. Sound needs a medium; an intervening substance through which it can travel from point to point; it must be carried on something. That something can be solid, liquid or gas. They can hear you scream underwater ... briefly. Water is a medium. Air is a medium. Nightclub walls are a medium.… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAnalogAVDigitalLoudspeakerProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Friday, July 15, 2016
    image
    Bob Thurmond 07/15/16 01:09 PM,
    EDITOR’S NOTE: This fine article was featured in the March 2004 issue of Live Sound International. We reprint it here in celebration of our 25th anniversary. How many sound systems are in use? Many millions, for sure, and they’re found in all types of venues and for all kinds of programs. So one would think we’d know exactly how to do it by now. But there seems to be plenty of examples to prove that we don’t. Why should this… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAnalogAVDigitalEducationLoudspeakerMeasurementSound ReinforcementSystem

  • Monday, May 23, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Bob McCarthy 05/23/16 10:27 AM,
    Go here to read part 1 of this series.————————————————— “In the beginning there was graphic EQ.” The first standard tool for system equalization was the graphic equalizer. Early versions were 10 bands at octave intervals, but the 1/3rd-octave version took over the market completely by the late 1970s. The 31 bands were standardized to a series of 1/3rd-octave intervals beginning with 31 Hz. There was no standardization of the shape of the filters, however. One model might use 1/3 octave… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAnalogDigitalMeasurementProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Friday, May 13, 2016
    loudspeakers
    PSW Staff 05/13/16 06:45 AM,
    Line arrays and large-format loudspeakers get the lion’s share of attention, but in reality most sound companies don’t need a large system at every event. Many can be handled with smart deployment of more compact 2-way loudspeakers, usually accompanied by a small quantity of subwoofers. While we tend to think of loudspeakers along these lines as entry-level “speakers on a stick,” numerous manufacturers have developed higher-quality models that go beyond that metric, yet they’re still below the radar in terms… View this story
    Filed in: AVLive SoundFeatureAmplifierAVLoudspeakerMonitoringNetworkingProcessorSound ReinforcementSubwoofer

  • Tuesday, May 10, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Merlijn van Veen 05/10/16 07:49 AM,
    In this article we’ll investigate how the speed of sound in air is, for all intents and purposes, exclusively temperature dependent within the audible bandwidth of our typical applications. There are some popular misconceptions on this subject related to pressure, density, and other effects that are addressed here. The speed of sound is the distance traveled per second through an elastic medium. The medium is composed of molecules held together by intermolecular forces. Sound energy passes through the medium by… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConcertMeasurementSignalSound Reinforcement

  • image
    Pat Brown 05/10/16 06:42 AM,
      Crossover networks are not unique to audio and acoustics. The role of such a network is to produce a transition between two systems of differing capabilities. In a loudspeaker system, an increased overall bandwidth is achieved by splicing together two or more lower bandwidth transducer responses. An individual woofer, squawker and tweeter can form a full-range system through the use of a crossover network. Let’s look at some other systems that require similar transitions between their individual components. Several… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallAVLoudspeakerMeasurementProcessorSignal

  • Friday, May 06, 2016
    image
    Teri Hogan 05/06/16 11:47 AM,
    A concert sound system is, in reality, two completely separate sound systems, joined at the hip by a split snake. Each system requires a skilled engineer, but the skill-sets between the two differ vastly. The thing that baffles me is how ill regarded the position of monitor engineer is among my brethren. It can be easily argued and defended that the monitor engineer works twice as hard as everyone else on the crew, unless he/she is lucky enough to have… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConcertEngineerMonitoringSound ReinforcementStageTechnician

  • Wednesday, April 20, 2016
    loudspeakers
    Pat Brown 04/20/16 06:53 AM,
      A loudspeaker array is a collection of loudspeakers that is assembled to achieve a coverage pattern that cannot be achieved with a single device. Arrays are most commonly implemented to achieve a wide horizontal coverage pattern from a position on or above the stage. The “perfect” array would be a collection of loudspeakers whose radiation pattern was indistinguishable from a single (hypothetical) device that provided the needed pattern for the audience area. Many attempts have been made to solve… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallAVLoudspeakerMeasurementSound Reinforcement

  • Friday, April 08, 2016
    meyer sound
    Bob McCarthy 04/08/16 12:35 PM,
    We live in the present and plan for the future. Every once in a while it can be interesting to look back at our history and see he we got here. This puts things in perspective and helps us see what’s coming. The essential challenges to tuning a sound reinforcement system, a process we now call optimization, haven’t changed in 40 years, and neither have the laws of physics. But the tools and techniques of the trade have changed dramatically,… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAnalogDigitalLoudspeakerMeasurementProcessorSoftwareSound Reinforcement



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